Home Overview People Places Industry Clothing & Products Interactives * Contact Us Help
You are in: Industry > > Selling Cotton Learning Journey Step 5: Cotton Board Print Page     Email Page  
* * *
*
*
*
*
*
Indutrialisation
Click the Learning Journeys below to explore. Topics suitable for young learners are also indicated.
*
*
*
Suitable for young learners
*
*
*
Suitable for young learners
*
*
*
Suitable for young learners
*
*
*
People
*

Selling Cotton Learning Journey

Selling is as important as production because without markets and the means of exchanging wares for money or goods there is no profit or benefit for the producer. If products are sold regionally, nationally and internationally, selling involves a complex network of manufacturing, 'middle-men', warehousing, trading and promotion. Cotton manufacture had simple beginnings but it became a global product.

Click on the steps below to explore.

                        
Selling Cotton Learning Journey Step 5: Cotton Board
Image Number: 2000832
In 1940 the Cotton Board was set up to '...promote the welfare of the industry by internal reorganisation, by the development of export trade, scientific research, propaganda and other means...'

The headquarters of the new organisation was in Manchester together with the Colour, Design and Style Centre, a sister organisation which was the public face of the Cotton Board. British fashions and fabrics, designs and ideas were showcased at a number of national and international exhibitions.

Photographs were taken of a number of Cotton Board promotions over the years to try and increase sales of Lancashire cotton, ranging from an exhibition on the history of cotton to a display of 1960s children's clothing, from images of cotton workers in the mills, clothing and soft furnishing promotions at Kendal's and other large stores, to fashion shows of the 1950s and 1960s which offer a fascinating glimpse of post-war fashions.

The Cotton Board was responsible for a number of initiatives which included work on new methods for utilising labour, design innovations, recruitment and training, and the encouragement of collaboration within the cotton industry. Sir Stafford Cripps praised the work of the Cotton Board in a speech he gave at the Midland Hotel in Manchester on 4th December 1946. Gradually however the cotton trade lost out to synthetic easy care fabrics and the Cotton Board ceased to exist in 1969.


see the Cotton Board photographs and the Marketing section on this website
*
Associated Objects
*
Related Narratives
*
*
*
Image: Bobbins of cotton on a winding machine Image: The Mill Steam Engine at Queen Street Mill, Burnley
Image: a Cylinder Devil machine Image: a Cotton Gin machine
Image: Condenser mule used in the spinning process Image: Plans of machinery used in cotton spinning; the Mule Jenny
New Opportunities Fund - Lottery Funded - logo
*
*
© Manchester City Council | Terms & conditions